Posted by: TC Maurice | January 5, 2021

Meeting Announcement

WHEN: January 13th 2021

Where: THERE WILL BE NO INPERSON COMPONENT OF THE MEETING THIS MONTH. THE MEETING WILL BE ENTIRELY CONDUCTED VIA ZOOM.

Join Zoom Meeting
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Meeting ID: 892 8137 1215
Passcode: 065716
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Time: 7pm

Speaker: You! This will be a roundtable member participation event.

TOPIC: Examples of good & bad cooperation in joint Army-Navy operations during the Civil War.

Presidents Message; My Fellow Members:  Happy New Year. I hope everyone is healthy and doing well.   Our next meeting on January 13 will be our annual Roundtable debate.  This will be a completely virtual meeting.  Ed and Tim will run the technical aspects of the Zoom meeting, and I will serve as debate moderator.  The topic will be examples of good & bad cooperation in joint Army-Navy operations during the Civil War. I have already heard from several members who have good information to contribute to the discussion. I encourage everyone to participate; Ed and Tim will have a “raise hand” function worked out on Zoom,  so we can all jump in and not worry about speaking over someone else.

I will circulate the Zoom link for the January 13 meeting a couple of days before the 13th.

For more information on the debate and the Roundtable in general, please go to our website at http://www.Centralohiocwrt.wordpress.com. 

Treasurer’s Report from Pete Zuhars:

Treasurer’s Report for December 2020

Beginning checking account balance 12/1/2020 = $2190.10

November receipts = $20.00 donation

November expenses = $0

Ending checking account balance 12/31/2020 = $2210.10

Posted by: TC Maurice | January 4, 2021

Meeting Announcement

WHEN: January 13th 2021

Where: THERE WILL BE NO INPERSON COMPONENT OF THE MEETING THIS MONTH. THE MEETING WILL BE ENTIRELY CONDUCTED VIA ZOOM.

Zoom link will be published in a few days.

Time: 7pm

Speaker: You! This will be a roundtable member participation event.

TOPIC: Examples of good & bad cooperation in joint Army-Navy operations during the Civil War.

Presidents Message; My Fellow Members:  Happy New Year. I hope everyone is healthy and doing well.   Our next meeting on January 13 will be our annual Roundtable debate.  This will be a completely virtual meeting.  Ed and Tim will run the technical aspects of the Zoom meeting, and I will serve as debate moderator.  The topic will be examples of good & bad cooperation in joint Army-Navy operations during the Civil War. I have already heard from several members who have good information to contribute to the discussion. I encourage everyone to participate; Ed and Tim will have a “raise hand” function worked out on Zoom,  so we can all jump in and not worry about speaking over someone else.

I will circulate the Zoom link for the January 13 meeting a couple of days before the 13th.

For more information on the debate and the Roundtable in general, please go to our website at http://www.Centralohiocwrt.wordpress.com. 

Treasurer’s Report from Pete Zuhars:

Treasurer’s Report for December 2020

Beginning checking account balance 12/1/2020 = $2190.10

November receipts = $20.00 donation

November expenses = $0

Ending checking account balance 12/31/2020 = $2210.10

Posted by: TC Maurice | November 29, 2020

No Meeting in December

Members please remember that there is NO roundtable meeting in December. Please stay safe and enjoy the holidays.

Presidents Message:

My Fellow Members:  I hope everyone is healthy and doing well.  As is our tradition, we will not meet in December.  Our next meeting in January will be our annual Roundtable debate.  This year, since we will have members attending virtually, I thought that we should discuss a little broader (and maybe a little less dialectic) topic by discussing examples of good & bad cooperation in joint Army-Navy operations during the Civil War. Our last speaker, Craig Swain, gave us some great examples of poor (and non-existent) cooperation between the Union Army and Navy forces at Fort Sumter throughout the War. As always, I encourage everyone to do a little research and be prepared to participate.  I am sure that,  with a little bit of thought, you can all come up with a number of examples to discuss. I would really like to hear something about Confederate joint operations if anyone can come up with something on point.

I will circulate the Zoom link for the annual debate when I circulate my January 2021 newsletter in late December.

For more information on the debate and the Roundtable in general, please go to our website at Centralohiocwrt.wordpress.com. 

Our Treasurer’s Report from Dave Delisio:

Treasurer’s Report for November 2020

Beginning checking account balance 11/1/2020 = $2190.10

November receipts = $20.00 donation

November expenses = $0

Ending checking account balance 11/30/2020 = $2210.10

Dave has asked to be relieved of his Treasurer duties, which he has performed admirably for eight years.  I have accepted Dave’s retirement from office, and I have asked Pete Zuhars to fill in the void. If anyone else is interested in serving, please let me know and Pete will gladly stand aside.  I want to thank Dave Delisio for doing such a great job that I never had to worry about anything regarding the financial standing of the Roundtable. I hope everyone will give Dave a hearty “Atta-a-boy” the next time you see him (either live or virtually).

I have also attached hereto Tom Ayres Report of our meeting in November, when Craig Swain talked to us about the Siege and Reduction of fort Sumter. Tom has done his usual superb job of reporting on the speaker and his topic, and adding information of interest to our members.

https://centralohiocwrt.files.wordpress.com/2020/11/seige-and-reduction-of-fort-sumter-3.pdf


Jamie Ryan
President

Here is an announcement by the National Park Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service concerning Land and Water Conservation Fund revenues that will be targeted this fiscal year towards the acquisition of private land by willing sellers in or near Civil War related National Park Service sites;

Mill Springs National Battlefield Monument, Kentucky: $425,000 to purchase property located between Mill Springs Battlefield Road and the western banks of the Cumberland River. This tract contains an original Confederate trench line, the site of Brig. Gen. Zollicoffer’s headquarters, a 2-gun cannon battery position, and the Confederate cemetery. Indentations in the ground remain from hundreds of Confederate cabins. The battlefield is the site of the Union’s first decisive Civil War victory and where Zollicoffer, a congressman from Tennessee, was killed. Its importance was recognized by both sides during the war and acquisition of this parcel will preserve this historically significant area.

Vicksburg National Military Park, Lousiana/Mississippi: $1,453,000 to acquire 21 tracts purchased by the American Battlefield Trust for the purposes of creating the Champion Hill Unit of Vicksburg National Military Park. They are in the highest tier of lands identified for acquisition in the park’s 2018 Land Protection Plan. In addition to its historical significance, this area connects to adjacent tracts (800 acres) donated by the state of Mississippi in 2019 to help form a contiguous park. The area has experienced threats of encroachments, poaching, and archaeological resource theft. Acquisition will allow the resources to be protected and visitors to access a portion of the core battlefield.

River Raisin National Battlefield Park, Michigan: $1.1 million to acquire 72 tracts of lands that are located in the core area of the unit, including the Springwells site and the Hulls Trace unit. Fee and easement interests will be donated to protect a variety of archaeological and cultural landscape resources directly relating to the battles. This includes the site where the U.S. launched the first shots of the War of 1812 and more than 1,000 years ago native residents of Springwells toiled, prospered and raised monuments. The acquisition will also provide recreational opportunities associated with increased public access the Huron River.

Battlefield Parks (multiple states): $621,000 to acquire high priority battlefield land inholdings within the National Park System that are experiencing significant threat to the resource. These lands are often temporarily protected by partner organizations able to nimbly navigate real estate acquisition and then wait for the federal government to bring the land into individual park units. As of December 30, 2018, within park units that have battlefields there are over 36,000 unprotected acres in individual parcels. Funds from this project will be directed to the highest priority “shovel ready” acquisitions, which will be dynamic as landowners consider options once funding is available.

Fort Donelson National Battlefield, Tennessee: $559,000 to obtain tracts that will protect battlefield land that saw considerable action and troop movement. In this area of the Confederate Break-Out, the Confederates attempted an unsuccessful surprise assault in hopes of opening a corridor to flee the Fort. In addition, these lands are affiliated with the former African-American community, “Free State” (created by those formerly enslaved). They include historical structures such as surviving “colored school,” and an abandoned African-American Methodist Church. Acquisition of these tracts will complete the Confederate Break-Out area and the primary “Free State” interpretive area for public use and access.

Shiloh National Military Park, Tennessee: $558,000 to acquire seven tracts that are part of the Fallen Timbers battlefield. The tracts are owned by the American Battlefield Trust and comprise 57 percent of the Fallen Timbers site. Tens of thousands of citizens from across the nation directly donated funds to complete the purchase and preservation of these tracts. The site lacks protection by an authorized land management steward and archaeological resources associated with the Civil War and other periods of human occupation are unprotected and open to looting. Sites have also recently experienced vandalism to existing structures and natural features. The purchase of these tracts will significantly enhance the battlefield scenery and permit visitor access to the property for recreational use consistent with park purposes.

Stones River National Battlefield, Tennessee: $243,000 to purchase part of the core battlefield and the scene of intense fighting, including the location of Federal artillery on the final day of the battle. The Union victory at this site resulted in the Confederate withdrawal from middle Tennessee. Acquisition of this tract would protect the site of significant battlefield action, enhance wildlife habitat, and provide for trail development for visitor access and recreation.

Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park, Texas: $3.5 million to purchase the last high-priority core battlefield inholding, containing valuable cultural resources including much of the Mexican battle line; Arista’s Hill, which was used as a vantage point by commanding Mexican General Mariano Arista during the battle; and the Palo Alto Inn, which was constructed during the U.S.-Mexican War to serve as a stopover for individuals traveling from Port Isabel to Matamoros, Mexico. Protection of this property will expand recreational access for almost 260,000 neighbors, giving visitors the ability to visit the entire battlefield and it will provide more than 10 miles of trail to connect current battlefield trails to city trails, including the 8.5 mile Historic Battlefield Rail-Trail.

Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, Virginia: $931,000 to acquire two tracts that fall within the 1989 revised boundary and are located at the Spotsylvania Court House Battlefield, which received the highest condition and significance ratings from the Civil War Sites Advisory Commission. Acquisition of these tracts provides important access and interpretive opportunities to key areas of the battlefield, preserving the sense of place that surrounds Burnside Drive. Burnside Drive is the scene of heavy fighting during a May 12, 1864 battle.

Petersburg National Battlefield, Virgina: $341,000 to but land that is at the core of two nationally significant battles (as determined by the Civil War Sites Advisory Commission and approved by Congress). Acquisition would allow for long-term protection and preservation of key terrain and the many landscape elements that have survived. The federal objective of destroying Confederate supply lines, especially railroads, into Petersburg and Richmond is best exhibited and interpreted on these locations. Local law enforcement have dealt with cases of relic hunting in the area but lack legal authority to enforce action under the Archaeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA); Federal law enforcement will be able to enforce the Act more effectively.

Posted by: TC Maurice | November 3, 2020

Updated Meeting Announcement

WHEN: NOVEMBER 11th

WHERE:   THERE WILL BE NO INPERSON COMPONENT OF THE MEETING THIS MONTH. THE MEETING WILL BE ENTIRELY CONDUCTED VIA ZOOM.

JOIN ZOOM MEETING:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86958770533?pwd=ejZ2d2Y0YklzMnN6RGZBK0FVOS9TQT09

Time: 7pm

Speaker: Craig Swain

Topic: The Siege and Reduction of Fort Sumter

The Civil War’s Fort Sumter is known for its famous battle marking the start of the Civil War.  But the campaign to control it, and thus Charleston, South Carolina, played out from the opening weeks of the war right through the final days of the conflict.  This grueling, sustained effort is often forgotten in our studies today, yet was at the fore of newspaper accounts of the war.  Over the course of forty-six months, Federals sought to regain control of the fort… or failing that to reduce it. Meanwhile the Confederates worked just as hard to maintain their tenuous hold on the fort at the mouth of Charleston harbor.  The battle featured three major bombardments, eight minor bombardments, and countless “skirmishes” involving the heaviest artillery used during the war. The effort against Fort Sumter was an important part in the greater war effort, both North and South.  Yet, we might say this battle was robbed of its proper place in history due to a turn of events in April 1865.  

Craig Swain is a graduate of Westminster College, Fulton, Missouri, with a BA in history.  Commissioned in the Army after college, he served in Korea, Kuwait, various overseas postings, and Fort Stewart, Georgia.  After leaving the Army, he continued his studies at Missouri State University.  He is author of numerous articles appearing in Civil War Times, America’s Civil War, Artilleryman, and other magazines.  His blog, “To the Sound of the Guns,” covers various aspects of the war, but with focus on artillery and the Charleston theater of war.  Craig is presently an information technology manager for the Internal Revenue Service.

November Presidents Message

My Fellow Members:  I hope everyone is healthy and doing well.   First, I want to explain what happened to our October 14 meeting. Our speaker was on vacation until a few days before the meeting, so we decided to have a practice session with him the day before the meeting. At that time, the speaker found out that his laptop (which included his presentation) had been corrupted, and he was not able to get it fixed before our meeting. Mike Peters tried to get a pinch-hitter to speak, but we simply did not have enough time to make it happen. 

Our next meeting will be on Veteran’s Day, November 11, 2020 at La Navona at 154 North Hamilton Road in Gahanna at 7 pm, with all the required social distancing requirements.   Our presenter will be Craig Swain, a graduate of Westminster College, Fulton, Missouri, with a BA in history.  Mr. Swain was  commissioned in the Army after college, he served in Korea, Kuwait, various overseas postings, and Fort Stewart, Georgia.  After leaving the Army, Craig continued his studies at Missouri State University. 


Mr. Swain’s presentation is entitled the Siege and Reduction of Fort Sumter – The Civil War’s Longest Battle.  Fort Sumter is known for its famous battle marking the start of the Civil War.  But the campaign to control it, and thus Charleston, South Carolina, played out from the opening weeks of the war right through the final days of the conflict.  This grueling, sustained effort is often forgotten in our studies today, yet was at the fore of newspaper accounts of the war.  Over the course of forty-six months, Federals sought to regain control of the fort… or failing that, to reduce it. Meanwhile the Confederates worked just as hard to maintain their tenuous hold on the fort at the mouth of Charleston harbor.  The battle featured three major bombardments, eight minor bombardments, and countless “skirmishes” involving the heaviest artillery used during the war. The effort against Fort Sumter was an important part in the greater war effort, both North and South.  Yet, we might say, this battle was robbed of its proper place in history due to a turn of events in April 1865.  

Our speaker will not be making the trip to Columbus for the meeting, but rather will present remotely. 

For more information on Mr. Swain and his presentation’s presentation, please go to our website at Centralohiocwrt.wordpress.com.  

If you come to La Navona, you are going to have to follow the safety protocols:

**You will be required to wear a mask in the building.  I know that no one likes this rule, but I have to insist upon strict compliance with the rule in order to make all our members feel safe. If you do not bring a mask, you will be asked to leave.

**We will not shake hands or otherwise make physical contact with each other.

**We will sit at least six feet apart from other members (unless you are family).

If you do not feel you can comply with these rules, I ask you to please stay home and (hopefully) log onto the meeting from your home computer.  I am not trying to make any political statements; I am simply respecting our host venue, who could be shut down if we do not follow these rules.  La Navona allows us to use their facility without charging the Roundtable a dime; I cannot let anyone from our Roundtable endanger La Navona’s ability to continue doing business.   

You can also attend the meeting virtually by the Zoom link set forth below. Ed Chadwick and Tim Maurice have continued to work hard on this project, and we will have a “dry run” of the meeting with Mr. Swain before the meeting to try to iron out the wrinkles.  We will continue to try to improve the experience each and every month until we get it down pat. Again, I ask for your patience and support.  There are a lot of moving pieces to the project!!

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86958770533?pwd=ejZ2d2Y0YklzMnN6RGZBK0FVOS9TQT09

Dial in:

        +1 646 558 8656

Meeting ID: 869 5877 0533

Passcode: 660491

One last word on Zoom meeting protocols. Please put yourself on Mute until we go to the Q&A session at the end.  Please pay attention to any Chat messages sent; we are usually trying to inform one or more of the Zoom participants that they have not muted themselves.  Finally, if you are not dressed appropriately for a meeting, please disable the video on the Zoom screen so you are not showing the rest of the meeting participants that you are not dressed appropriately.  If you have any questions about these protocols, PLEASE contact me. And if you don’t want to use your computer to join the meeting, you can always call in using the number and meeting ID set forth above.

Our Treasurer’s Report from Dave Delisio:

Treasurer’s Report for October 2020

Beginning checking account balance 10/1/2020 = $2165.10

October receipts = $25.00 from dues

October expenses = $0

Ending checking account balance 10/31/2020 = $2190.10

Thank you to all our members who have contributed to acquiring the equipment to run a virtual meeting.  We had great success last month, and we intend to continue to improve.

Jamie Ryan
President

Posted by: TC Maurice | October 30, 2020

Updated Meeting Announcement

WHEN: NOVEMBER 11th

WHERE:   THERE WILL BE NO INPERSON COMPONENT OF THE MEETING THIS MONTH. THE MEETING WILL BE ENTIRELY CONDUCTED VIA ZOOM.

JOIN ZOOM MEETING:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86958770533?pwd=ejZ2d2Y0YklzMnN6RGZBK0FVOS9TQT09

Time: 7pm

Speaker: Craig Swain

Topic: The Siege and Reduction of Fort Sumter

The Civil War’s Fort Sumter is known for its famous battle marking the start of the Civil War.  But the campaign to control it, and thus Charleston, South Carolina, played out from the opening weeks of the war right through the final days of the conflict.  This grueling, sustained effort is often forgotten in our studies today, yet was at the fore of newspaper accounts of the war.  Over the course of forty-six months, Federals sought to regain control of the fort… or failing that to reduce it. Meanwhile the Confederates worked just as hard to maintain their tenuous hold on the fort at the mouth of Charleston harbor.  The battle featured three major bombardments, eight minor bombardments, and countless “skirmishes” involving the heaviest artillery used during the war. The effort against Fort Sumter was an important part in the greater war effort, both North and South.  Yet, we might say this battle was robbed of its proper place in history due to a turn of events in April 1865.  

Craig Swain is a graduate of Westminster College, Fulton, Missouri, with a BA in history.  Commissioned in the Army after college, he served in Korea, Kuwait, various overseas postings, and Fort Stewart, Georgia.  After leaving the Army, he continued his studies at Missouri State University.  He is author of numerous articles appearing in Civil War Times, America’s Civil War, Artilleryman, and other magazines.  His blog, “To the Sound of the Guns,” covers various aspects of the war, but with focus on artillery and the Charleston theater of war.  Craig is presently an information technology manager for the Internal Revenue Service.

November Presidents Message

My Fellow Members:  I hope everyone is healthy and doing well.   First, I want to explain what happened to our October 14 meeting. Our speaker was on vacation until a few days before the meeting, so we decided to have a practice session with him the day before the meeting. At that time, the speaker found out that his laptop (which included his presentation) had been corrupted, and he was not able to get it fixed before our meeting. Mike Peters tried to get a pinch-hitter to speak, but we simply did not have enough time to make it happen. 

Our next meeting will be on Veteran’s Day, November 11, 2020 at La Navona at 154 North Hamilton Road in Gahanna at 7 pm, with all the required social distancing requirements.   Our presenter will be Craig Swain, a graduate of Westminster College, Fulton, Missouri, with a BA in history.  Mr. Swain was  commissioned in the Army after college, he served in Korea, Kuwait, various overseas postings, and Fort Stewart, Georgia.  After leaving the Army, Craig continued his studies at Missouri State University. 


Mr. Swain’s presentation is entitled the Siege and Reduction of Fort Sumter – The Civil War’s Longest Battle.  Fort Sumter is known for its famous battle marking the start of the Civil War.  But the campaign to control it, and thus Charleston, South Carolina, played out from the opening weeks of the war right through the final days of the conflict.  This grueling, sustained effort is often forgotten in our studies today, yet was at the fore of newspaper accounts of the war.  Over the course of forty-six months, Federals sought to regain control of the fort… or failing that, to reduce it. Meanwhile the Confederates worked just as hard to maintain their tenuous hold on the fort at the mouth of Charleston harbor.  The battle featured three major bombardments, eight minor bombardments, and countless “skirmishes” involving the heaviest artillery used during the war. The effort against Fort Sumter was an important part in the greater war effort, both North and South.  Yet, we might say, this battle was robbed of its proper place in history due to a turn of events in April 1865.  

Our speaker will not be making the trip to Columbus for the meeting, but rather will present remotely.  We will have an in-person meeting at La Navona for those of you who chose to attend, but we will be viewing Phil’s presentation on the big screen there.  I am having knee replacement surgery on October 30, so I do not know if I will be ambulatory enough to attend in person, but (if not) I will participate via Zoom.

For more information on Mr. Swain and his presentation’s presentation, please go to our website at Centralohiocwrt.wordpress.com.  

If you come to La Navona, you are going to have to follow the safety protocols:

**You will be required to wear a mask in the building.  I know that no one likes this rule, but I have to insist upon strict compliance with the rule in order to make all our members feel safe. If you do not bring a mask, you will be asked to leave.

**We will not shake hands or otherwise make physical contact with each other.

**We will sit at least six feet apart from other members (unless you are family).

If you do not feel you can comply with these rules, I ask you to please stay home and (hopefully) log onto the meeting from your home computer.  I am not trying to make any political statements; I am simply respecting our host venue, who could be shut down if we do not follow these rules.  La Navona allows us to use their facility without charging the Roundtable a dime; I cannot let anyone from our Roundtable endanger La Navona’s ability to continue doing business.   

You can also attend the meeting virtually by the Zoom link set forth below. Ed Chadwick and Tim Maurice have continued to work hard on this project, and we will have a “dry run” of the meeting with Mr. Swain before the meeting to try to iron out the wrinkles.  We will continue to try to improve the experience each and every month until we get it down pat. Again, I ask for your patience and support.  There are a lot of moving pieces to the project!!

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86958770533?pwd=ejZ2d2Y0YklzMnN6RGZBK0FVOS9TQT09

Dial in:

        +1 646 558 8656

Meeting ID: 869 5877 0533

Passcode: 660491

One last word on Zoom meeting protocols. Please put yourself on Mute until we go to the Q&A session at the end.  Please pay attention to any Chat messages sent; we are usually trying to inform one or more of the Zoom participants that they have not muted themselves.  Finally, if you are not dressed appropriately for a meeting, please disable the video on the Zoom screen so you are not showing the rest of the meeting participants that you are not dressed appropriately.  If you have any questions about these protocols, PLEASE contact me. And if you don’t want to use your computer to join the meeting, you can always call in using the number and meeting ID set forth above.

Our Treasurer’s Report from Dave Delisio:

Treasurer’s Report for October 2020

Beginning checking account balance 10/1/2020 = $2165.10

October receipts = $25.00 from dues

October expenses = $0

Ending checking account balance 10/31/2020 = $2190.10

Thank you to all our members who have contributed to acquiring the equipment to run a virtual meeting.  We had great success last month, and we intend to continue to improve.

Jamie Ryan
President

Posted by: TC Maurice | October 13, 2020

October Meeting Canceled

The Roundtable’s speaker scheduled for our October 14th 2020 meeting is not going to be able to present. Therefore the decision has been made to Cancel the meeting for this month. The November meeting will occure as scheduled.

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