Posted by: TC Maurice | September 16, 2020

Announcement

We have received word today of the passing away of Mr. Ed Bearss. The former Chief Historian of the National Park Service. He was 97 years old. Ed worked tirelessly to preserve Civil War battlefields, interpret and educate the nation about the events surrounding and occurring during this nations darkest hours, and preserve and perpetuate the memory of the service and sacrifices made by our Civil War ancestors. The Central Ohio Civil War Roundtable sends its deepest sympathies to Mr. Bearss family. The Civil War Community has lost a giant and a good friend.

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Posted by: TC Maurice | August 28, 2020

Meeting Announcement

When: September 9th

Where:  La Navona, 154 North Hamilton Road. Gahanna Ohio 43230
AND on Zoom

Time:  7pm

Speaker:  Phillip S. Greenwalt

Topic:  The Battle of Olustee

The Battle of Olustee, the largest engagement fought in Florida, had reverberations that rippled through both the North and South. For the Union, the failure to subdue the entirety of East Florida, sever the rail link across the Suwannee River, and interrupt the flow of material and aid to Southern armies in other theaters was a direct cause of their defeat. Yet, the North retained a foothold in Florida, to coincide with permanent occupations of Fernandina and St. Augustine and with the United State Navy blockading the coastline and patrolling the vital St. John’s River.

For the Southerners, the failure to follow-up the victory and crush General Truman Seymour’s forces allowed for a continued Union army presence in the state. The lack of railroad infrastructure kept more Confederate foot-soldiers from being available. Georgians under General Alfred Colquitt marched over 40 miles in a 24-hour period just to reach Florida just to be available for the contest. Issues with the general officer corps also plagued the rebels.

With the presence of African-American soldiers, atrocities committed and blamed also ensued which underscored the racial tensions that the war had provoked by 1864.

These elements in addition to the failure of both sides, before, during, and after the Battle of Olustee make this engagement a “forgotten battle” that had implications that reached farther than the swamps, wetlands, and pine barrens of Florida. Yet, out of the 5,500 soldiers brought into the contest, 203 were killed, 1,152 wounded, and 506 declared missing for a total of 1,861 or 34% of those engaged. Southern forces suffered 93 killed, 847 wounded, and six missing for a total of 946 men, 19% of their forces. Which underscores the ferocity of the engagement.

To put it more bluntly, one only has to read the last four words of the telegram that General Seymour sent to General Quincy Gillmore following the battle;

Olustee was “a devilish hard rub.”

The discussion will put the Battle of Olustee in the context for what it meant in Confederate Florida and for the larger war effort itself; for Northern ambitions and Southern defiance.

Phillip S. Greenwalt is co-founder of Emerging Revolutionary War and a full-time contributor to Emerging Civil War. He is the author or co-author of five books on the American Revolution and the American Civil War. Phillip graduated with a degree in

President Washington’s boyhood on display at local national park

history from Wheeling Jesuit University and earned a graduate degree in American history from George Mason University. He is currently a Supervisory Park Ranger in Interpretation and Visitor Services at Everglades National Park. Prior to his current position Phillip spent seven years as historian at George Washington Birthplace National Monument and Thomas Stone National Historic Site. He has also served in work details to Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine, Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park, Morristown National Historical Park, and De Soto National Memorial throughout his National Park Service career.

September Presidents Message

My Fellow Roundtable Members:  I hope everyone is healthy and doing well.   Our next meeting is set for La Navona on Wednesday, September 9 at 7 pm, with all the required social distancing requirements.   Our presenter will be Phillip Greenwalt, and his presentation will be on the Battle of Olustee, Florida’s largest Civil War battle.  Phillip is a Floridian, so he will not be making the trip to Columbus for the meeting, but rather will present remotely.  We will have an in-person meeting at La Navona for those of you who chose to attend (I will be there), but we will be viewing Phillip’s presentation on the big screen there.

Phillip will inform us about this “forgotten” battle, which Union commander Truman Seymour described as “a devilish hard rub.”  For more information on Mr. Greenwalt’s presentation, please go to our website at Centralohiocwrt.wordpress.com.

If you come to La Navona, you are going to have to follow the safety protocols:

**You will be required to wear a mask in the building.  I know that no one likes this rule, but I have to insist upon strict compliance with the rule in order to make all our members feel safe. If you do not bring a mask, you will be asked to leave.

**We will not shake hands or otherwise make physical contact with each other.

**We will sit at least six feet apart from other members (unless you are family).

If you do not feel you can comply with these rules, I ask you to please stay home and (hopefully) log onto the meeting from your home computer.  I am not trying to make any political statements; I am simply respecting our host venue, who could be shut down if we do not follow these rules.  La Navona allows us to use their facility without charging the Roundtable a dime; I cannot let anyone from our Roundtable endanger La Navona’s ability to continue doing business.

You can also attend the meeting virtually by the Zoom link set forth below. Ed Chadwick and Tim Maurice have continued to work hard on this project, and we ran a “dry run” of the meeting with Mr. Greenwalt earlier this week that worked well.  We will continue to try to improve the experience each and every month until we get it down pat. Again, I ask for your patience and support.  There are a lot of moving pieces to the project!!

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87812427321?pwd=MGZTejQ3SVZZeXVBSG10aXRnN05EUT09

Meeting ID: 878 1242 7321

Passcode: 549416

One tap mobile

+13017158592,,87812427321#,,,,,,0#,,549416# US (Germantown)

+13126266799,,87812427321#,,,,,,0#,,549416# US (Chicago)

One last word on Zoom meeting protocols. Please put yourself on Mute until we go to the Q&A session at the end.  Please pay attention to any Chat messages sent; we are usually trying to inform one or more of the Zoom participants that they have not muted themselves.  Finally, if you are not dressed appropriately for a meeting, please disable the video on the Zoom screen so you are not showing the rest of the meeting participants that you are not dressed appropriately.  If you have any questions about these protocols, PLEASE contact me.

Our Treasurer’s Report from Dave Delisio:

Treasurer’s Report for July 2020

Beginning checking account balance 8/1/2020 = $2086.10

August receipts = $208.00 ($158.00 from meeting book raffle/match; $50.00 from member donation for computer)

August expenses = $330.00 ($100.00 to Mike Peters for speaker related expenses, $180.00 to Matt Borders for speaker fee, $50.00 to Ed Chadwick for computer accessory reimbursement)

Ending checking account balance 8/31/2020 = $1964.10

Thank you to all our members who have contributed to acquiring the equipment to run a virtual meeting.  We had great success last month, and we intend to continue to improve.

I have attached Tom Ayre’s report on the meeting, and three pictures from La Navona taken by Janet Maurice during the meeting.  I bought four extra copies of Matt Border’s book, Faces of Union Soldiers at Antietam, which Matt graciously signed.  Please let me know if anyone wants a copy for $20.

Faces of Union Soldiers at Antietam

Matt Borders

August 12, 2020

Matt Borders, a park ranger at Monocacy battlefield in Maryland, teamed up with Joseph Stahl to publish a volume of the title above featuring 36 Union Army soldiers who fought at Antietam on September 17, 1862.

The 36 infantrymen — officers and enlisted men — were chosen because they had formal photographs taken in uniform in the format of the popular greeting card of the day — Carte de visite. The CdV process was patented in Paris in 1854 by photographer Andre Adolphe Eugene Disderi.

Borders told the Roundtable that Union soldiers were chosen because very few Confederates had such photos taken. The cards were relatively expensive for the times. Stahl acquired all of the images that are featured in the book. Much of Borders’s discussion at the meeting dealt with the uniforms, insignia and other features of the attire of the soldiers.

Antietam is known as the single bloodiest day in American military history, producing almost 23,000 casualties on both sides, during 12 hours of fighting.

At his presentation before the Roundtable, Borders featured five soldiers — Elisah Burbank, a major in 12th Massachusetts regiment; Philip Sellers, a private in the 107th Pennsylvania; Jabez Miller, a first lieutenant in the 26th New York; Peter Kelchner, a sergeant in the 28th New York who was later promoted to captain of the 2nd NY Mounted Rifles; and, William Keiner, a sergeant in the 3rd Maryland.

“They were common soldiers just trying to do their duty,” Borders says of the entire group in his book.

The action at Antietam raged from around 6 a.m. until late in the day, after 5 p.m. It took place in six distinct locations, well known to Civil War buffs — cornfield, East woods, West woods, sunken road, lower bridge and Burnside bridge. Borders’s book illustrates the order of battle with maps of each of these phases.

Early morning action took place in a wedge of ground formed by two roads, the Hagerstown Pike to the west and Smoketown Road to the east, which intersected as they traveled south in a sharp-angled “V” just north of the famed Dunker Church. This was an horrific killing field that immortalized the

small cornfield and the two woods. Southern troops from mainly Georgia, Alabama and North Carolina were commanded by Daniel Harvey Hill.

In the earliest action, at dawn, Major General James Ricketts’s division of I Corps moved south toward the church. Its advance south was shortly augmented by the XII Corps. The 12th Massachusetts was in the first wave at the southern edge of the corn field. The 12th paid heavily for its leading wave. Of its strength of 325 men, 49 were killed, 165 wounded and 10 missing. Its commander Major Burbank suffered a serious wound to the foot. He was evacuated to a hospital in Frederick and was later placed in a private home with two other officers. He died in this home on November 30.

In this same fierce action the 107th Pennsylvania encountered three Confederate brigades. James MacThompson, a regimental captain, wrote in his official report, “…in 15 minutes we compelled them to fall back.” But the tide would turn as the rebels were re-enforced. Over some 45 minutes the Confederates drove the 107th back through the cornfield. “We held at bay a force of the enemy numerically five times our superior for considerably more than an hour, and at one time driving them,” MacThompson wrote.

In the 107th was Private Philip Sellers, who survived Antietam but was wounded in the thigh almost exactly a year later at Reams Station in Virginia. This occurred after he was captured at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, exchanged and re-enlisted for three years. He was discharged as disabled from his second wound on June 6, 1865. After the war Sellers moved to Kansas, where he died in 1909.

Of the other three soldiers, Miller, Kelchner and Keiner, the written record is fairly sketchy. Miller, a blacksmith before the war, served his two-year enlistment but did not re-enlist after discharge in May 1863. Kelchner was wounded seriously in the leg at Antietam but recovered and, as mentioned above, was promoted to officer of a mounted unit. Keiner was wounded in the left knee at Poplar Grove Church in September 1864, during the siege of Petersburg. He was mustered out of service April 2, 1865, at City Point, Virginia, in the final days of the war.

Posted by: TC Maurice | August 7, 2020

Meeting Announcement

When:  August 12th

Where:  La Navona, 154 North Hamilton Road. Gahanna Ohio 43230
AND on Zoom

Time: 7pm

Speaker:  Matt Borders

Topic:  Faces of Union Soldiers at Antietam

A long time student of American History and the Civil War, Matthew Borders holds a BA in US History and an MS in Historic Preservation. He has worked as a National Park 51cU4findaL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Service ranger at Antietam National Battlefield, as well as a historian and battlefield surveyor for the National Park Service’s American Battlefield Protection Program. He is also a Certified Battlefield Guide at Antietam and Harpers Ferry. In 2019, Matthew was honored to be the recipient of the Save Historic Antietam Foundation’s prestigious Dr. Joseph Harsh Award for his research topic: The Loudoun Valley Campaign of 1862: McClellan’s Final Advance.

Currently Matthew is a Park Ranger at Monocacy National 71GZfOWnjIL._US230_Battlefield in Frederick, Maryland and along with fellow guide, Joe Stahl, recently published his first book, Faces of Union Soldiers at Antietam. This work looks into 36 individual soldiers that fought at the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862, America’s Bloodiest Day. These images are previously unpublished and are of the men in the ranks, not the generals that commanded them. Join us as we discuss a selection of these soldiers, who they were, what they did on the field, and what we can glean from their images.

Presidents Message:

My Fellow Roundtable Members:  I hope everyone is healthy and doing well.   Our next meeting is set for La Navona on Wednesday, August 12 at 7 pm, with all the required social distancing requirements.   Our speaker  will be Matt Borders, and his presentation is entitled “Faces of Union Soldiers at Antietam.” Matt  is a passionate historian and preservationist. Matt has been in Maryland since 2007 after moving there with his wife from Michigan. He has worked in the National Park Service, museums and several nonprofits since that time and volunteers at multiple historic sites. Matt holds a BA in American History from Michigan State University, and an MS in Historic Preservation from Eastern Michigan University. He is also an NPS certified battlefield guide at Antietam National Battlefield.

If you come to La Navona, you are going to have to follow the safety protocols:

**   You will be required to wear a mask in the building.  I know that no one likes this rule, but I have to insist upon strict compliance with the rule in order to make all our members feel safe. If you do not bring a mask, you will be asked to leave.

**   We will not shake hands or otherwise make physical contact with each other.

**   We will sit at least six feet apart from other members (unless you are family).

If you do not feel you can comply with these rules, I ask you to please stay home and (hopefully) log onto the meeting from your home computer.  I am not trying to make any political statements; I am simply respecting our host venue, who could be shut down if we do not follow these rules.  La Navona allows us to use their facility without charging the Roundtable a dime; I cannot let anyone from our Roundtable endanger La Navona’s ability to continue doing business.

You can also attend the meeting virtually by the Zoom link set forth below. Ed Chadwick and Tim Maurice have continued to work hard on this project, and we ran a “dry run” of the meeting with Matt Borders a few weeks ago that worked well.  We will continue to try to improve the experience each and every month until we get it down pat. Again, I ask for your patience and support as we try to coordinate the virtual meetings over the Zoom link with the sound system of La Navona and the speaker’s PowerPoint presentation.  There are a lot of moving pieces to the project!!

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82202442114?pwd=SFBqM0NSUGhPNzQya3J5bzhQbXZXQT09

You can also call in and listen to the meeting by using the number set forth below:

1 301 715 8592

Meeting ID: 822 0244 2114

Passcode: 637010

One last word on Zoom meeting protocols. Please put yourself on Mute until we go to the Q&A session at the end.  Please pay attention to any Chat messages sent; we are usually trying to inform one or more of the Zoom participants that they have not muted themselves.  Finally, if you are not dressed appropriately for a meeting, please disable the video on the Zoom screen so you are not showing the rest of the meeting participants that you are not dressed appropriately.  If you have any questions about these protocols, PLEASE contact me.

Our Treasurer’s Report from Dave Delisio:

Treasurer’s Report for June 2020

Beginning checking account balance 7/1/2020 = $2195.93

July receipts = $885.00 ($10.00 from meeting book raffle; $110.00 from dues, $765.00 from member donations for computer)

July expenses = $994.83 ($100.00 to Mike Peters for speaker related expenses, $180.00 to Gary Dyson for speaker fee, $714.83 to Tim Maurice for computer/camera purchase reimbursement)

Ending checking account balance 7/31/2020 = $2086.10

Thank you to all our members who have contributed to acquiring the equipment to run a virtual meeting.

We do not have a Secretary’s report for last month’s meeting because the audio did not work on the Zoom link, where Tom Ayres was patiently waiting to take notes. We hope to nave better success this month.

Jamie Ryan
President, COCWRT

Posted by: TC Maurice | July 6, 2020

Meeting Announcement

When: July 8th

Where: La Navona, 154 North Hamilton Road. Gahanna Ohio 43230
AND on Zoom

Time:  7pm

Speaker:  Gary Dyson

Topic:  The Ambush of the Issac O. Smith

41sjjgqpVgL._SX373_BO1,204,203,200_The USS Isaac P. Smith was ambushed by Confederate shore batteries and captured on the Stono River near Charleston on January 30, 1863. John Wyer Dicks (Executive Officer) and Frederic Calvin Hills (Paymaster) were officers on the Smith, meeting each other as shipmates, spending time as prisoners of war together, and immediately after the Civil War becoming related when Frederic married John’s daughter Marianne. The Ambush of the Isaac P. Smith, Family Ties and the Battle on the Stono, January 30, 1863 tells the history of the Smith leading up to its capture as well as provides an account of the crew’s captivity, the lives of Dicks and Hills after the war, and some brief biographies of other combatants, North and South. Battle reports and eyewitness accounts were used to describe the battle. This book is published through Lulu.com and is available there as well as Amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com.

Gary L. Dyson is a retired Environmental Specialist from the city of Gaithersburg, MD14b93d7989af1ff58f124edd17cba3aad694a51ba6409de2 and a former Marine. He is a lifelong history enthusiast and has spent countless hours reading, researching and exploring battlefields – from the French and Indian War to Vietnam.  Gary owns Dyson Genealogy and Historical Research and is the author of Ambush of the Isaac P. Smith and A Civil War Correspondent in New Orleans, the Journals and Reports of Albert Gaius Hills of the Boston Journal as well as two Maryland church histories.  A book about Confederate Row at Mount Olivet Cemetery in Frederick, Maryland is in the works. He has a BS in Natural Resources from Oregon State University. Gary lives in Mount Airy, MD with his wife Emily and they are so close to being “empty-nesters.”

 

July Presidents Message:

My Fellow Roundtable Members:  I hope everyone is healthy and doing well.   Our next meeting is set for La Navona on July 8 for the 7 pm meeting, with all the new social distancing requirements.   Our old friend Gary Dyson will be our speaker.  Gary is a retired Environmental Specialist from the city of Gaithersburg, MD and a former Marine. He is a lifelong history enthusiast and has spent countless hours reading, researching and exploring battlefields – from the French and Indian War to Vietnam.  Gary will present on the unusual story of the USS Isaac P. Smith, which was ambushed by Confederate shore batteries and captured on the Stono River near Charleston, South Carolina on January 30, 1863. John Wyer Dicks (Executive Officer) and Frederic Calvin Hills (Paymaster) were officers on the Smith, meeting each other as shipmates, spending time as prisoners of war together, and (immediately after the Civil War) becoming related when Frederic married John’s daughter Marianne. Gary’s book, The Ambush of the Isaac P. Smith, Family Ties and the Battle on the Stono, January 30, 1863 tells the history of the Smith leading up to its capture, as well as providing an account of the crew’s captivity, the lives of Dicks and Hills after the war, and some brief biographies of other combatants, North and South. Battle reports and eyewitness accounts were used to describe the battle. This book is published through Lulu.com and is available there as well as Amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com.

If you come to La Navona, you are going to have to follow the new safety protocols:

**You will be required to wear a mask in the building.  I know that no one likes this rule, but I have to insist upon strict compliance with the rule in order to make all our members feel safe. If you do not bring a mask, you will be asked to leave.

**We will not shake hands or otherwise make physical contact with each other.

**We will sit at least six feet apart from other members (unless you are family).

If you do not feel you can comply with these rules, I ask you to please stay home and (hopefully) log onto the meeting from your home computer.  I am not trying to make any political statements; I am simply respecting our host venue, who could be shut down if we do not follow these rules.  La Navona allows us to use their facility without charging the Roundtable a dime; I cannot let anyone from our Roundtable endanger La Navona’s ability to start doing business again.

Now, let me give you an update on where we stand on our technology upgrade and the possibility of having our July 8 meeting available remotely via Zoom.  Your fellow Roundtable members have been very generous, and we will be able to upgrade our equipment. Members Ed Chadwick, Kevin Minerd and Tim Maurice have coordinated and are in the process of acquiring a new computer and related equipment. They will be visiting La Navona on July 3 to determine if they can broadcast the July 8 meeting via Zoom.  I will update you as soon as possible after July 3 to know if we will have a Zoom alternative this month.  But there will undoubtedly be enough time to get the system up & running by August.  However, we would still like to have members who have expertise with the Zoom platform reach out and help Ed, Kevin and Tim. Also, if you planned on contributing to the effort but have not had the chance to send a check, please do so. Zoom costs $160 for an annual subscription, and there are some cabling, lighting and sound equipment we can use to make the remote experience better for everyone.

I ask everyone to exercise patience and tolerance with the Zoom meeting process.  There wll be some hiccups; the sound quality will not always be perfect; the screen may freeze from time to time etc. In addition, if you are going to be watching the Zoom presentation from home, you will have to follow some basic rules of internet meeting decorum. Keep your screen on Mute at all times during the presentation (Zoom has a mute button in the lower left corner of the screen; use it).  When we go to the Question & Answer portion of the meeting at the end of Tom’s presentation, you will be permitted to unmute yourself if you want to ask a question. But PLEASE re-mute yourself as soon as you are done asking your question. If you are going to turn on the video, please remember that the rest of us in the Zoom meeting will be able to see you. Make sure your background is appropriate, and dress as if you are attending the meeting.

I received the following message earlier this month from Christopher Zimmer:

As a side note, I wanted to pass along that my son Quentin and I have been coming to the Roundtable meetings very intermittently for probably ten years or so, originally introduced to the group by Tim Maurice. Tim and I had previously worked at Cardinal Health together.  It wasn’t until a chance conversation that Tim and I had in which he mentioned the Roundtable that I even had any awareness of the COCWRT. Quentin and I started attending meetings when we were able.  I can tell you, as few as they have been, I am incredibly thankful for the opportunity to learn about our nation’s history and the events related to the Civil War.  These meetings (and the books that members would routinely give to Quentin – unrelated to raffle winnings…) have been a memorable experience for my son and I.

 I am exceptionally proud to mention that Quentin is reporting to the US Naval Academy on July 2nd to start his 9 year (minimum) journey in service and commitment to our country. The Roundtable has been a positive influence on my son and it has provided a window into our country’s past through the speaker presentations and by reading the many books we picked up as a result of attending meetings.  

 Finally, here is the Treasurer’s Report:

Treasurer’s Report for June 2020

Beginning checking account balance 6/1/2020 = $2165.93

June receipts = $30.00 ($5.00 from meeting book raffle; $25.00 from dues)

June expenses = $0

Ending checking account balance 6/30/2020 = $2195.93

Note: this report does not include donations received for the new computer fund.  Those funds will be reported next month.

Please look for another email from me next week.

Posted by: TC Maurice | June 7, 2020

Meeting Announcement

When: June 10th

Where: La Navona, 154 North Hamilton Road. Gahanna Ohio 43230
AND on Zoom

Time: 7pm

Speaker: Tom Clemens

Topic: Special Orders 191

“In the annals of military intelligence, there is nothing quite like the Lost Order. Even the most spectacular code-breaking accomplishments of World War II never handed one general’s army to another…” So wrote author Stephen Sears in 1995. But is this really the case? What did these famous orders tell General McClellan, and how did he use them? Was he, as he is so often accused, slow in responding? Please join historian Tom Clemens for a fresh, thought-provoking, and stimulating discussion of Special Orders 191, and its impact of the Maryland Campaign of 1862.

Dr. Thomas G. Clemens received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in history fromTom_Clemens Salisbury University, and his Doctorate in History Education from George Mason University, where he studied under noted Civil War historian Dr. Joseph L. Harsh.

He edited and annotated General Ezra A. Carman’s 1,800 page narrative of the Maryland Campaign of September 1862, which has received awards from the Army Heritage Foundation; the third and final volume was released in March of 2017.

Tom is a founding member and current president of Save Historic Antietam Foundation Inc., a non-profit historic preservation organization. In the past 5 years SHAF and the American Battlefield Trust have cooperated to purchase four properties, comprising 60 acres, inside the battlefield boundary. We have demolished six non-historic structures on these properties, and more non-historic structures will be removed soon.

He is also an NPS-certified Antietam Battlefield Guide, and a 30+ year volunteer there.

Additional Information concerning the upcoming meeting at La Novona and the option of attending remotely using Zoom from President Jamie Ryan.

My Fellow Roundtable Members:  I hope everyone is healthy and doing well.   The Governor has now allowed meetings to go forward, and the folks at La Navona are anxious to have us back on June 10 for the 7 pm meeting, with all the new social distancing requirements.   Tim Maurice and Mike Peters visited La Navona yesterday and Tim was able to set up a Zoom call with Tom Clemens, and everything worked successfully after a period of trial & error. Therefore, we will be going forward with the meeting at La Navona.  However, you will also be able to participate virtually from the comfort and safety of your home by simply jumping onto the Zoom link that I will forward to everyone next week.

I ask everyone to exercise patience and tolerance with the Zoom meeting process.  There wll be some hiccups; the sound quality will not always be perfect; the screen may freeze from time to time etc. In addition, if you are going to be watching the Zoom presentation from home, you will have to follow some basic rules of internet meeting decorum. Keep your screen on Mute at all times during the presentation (Zoom has a mute button in the lower left corner of the screen; use it).  When we go to the Question & Answer portion of the meeting at the end of Tom’s presentation, you will be permitted to unmute yourself if you want to ask a question. But PLEASE re-mute yourself as soon as you are done asking your question. If you are going to turn on the video, please remember that the rest of us in the Zoom meeting will be able to see you. Make sure your background is appropriate, and dress as if you are attending the meeting.

If you come to La Navona, you are going to have to follow the new safety protocols:

**You will be required to wear a mask in the building.  I know that no one likes this rule, but I have to insist upon strict compliance with the rule in order to make all our members feel safe. If you do not bring a mask, you will be asked to leave.

**We will not shake hands or otherwise make physical contact with each other.

**We will sit at least six feet apart from other members (unless you are family).

If you do not feel you can comply with these rules, I ask you to please stay home and log onto the meeting from your home computer.  I am not trying to make any political statements; I am simply respecting our host venue, who could be shut down if we do not follow these rules.  La Navona allows us to use their facility without charging the Roundtable a dime; I cannot let anyone from our Roundtable endanger La Navona’s ability to start doing business again.

Please look for another email from me next week with the Zoom link.

Posted by: TC Maurice | May 3, 2020

Meeting Announcement

The May Meeting has been Cancelled

Presidents Message:

My Fellow Roundtable Members:   Our meeting scheduled for May 13, 2020 is hereby cancelled pursuant to Governor DeWine’s order limiting gatherings in excess of ten people. Mike Peters and I asked our speaker if he wanted to do a Zoom presentation, but he deferred.  However, this raised an interesting question for me as we all deal with the concerns on gatherings created by COVID-19: would any of you be interested in having a Zoom (Or MicroSoft Teams or any other applicable online platform) meeting where we would have a speaker present a program?  I am envisioning a program where the speaker’s PowerPoint presentation would be displayed on your computer screen, with the speaker’s voice playing through your computer’s speakers.  Please send me an email response if you would be willing to try this type of virtual presentation.

The Treasurer’s report for April 2020  is the same as for March, since we have had no expenses.  I have received checks for dues from several members, but have not been able to get them to Dave to be deposited yet.

Treasurer’s Report for April 2020

Beginning checking account balance 4/1/2020 = $2,030.93

Ending checking account balance 5/1/2020 = $2,030.93

January started our new dues year.  Thank you to all the members who paid in January and February.  If you did not pay yet, please get your dues paid as soon as possible. Please give your payment to Dave or me; please do not pay Wendy cash for dues when she is trying to organize the book raffle, because it is very hard for us to keep track of who has paid. Also, please participate in our book raffle. I will continue to match the first $50 in contributions, but I would really appreciate it if EVERYONE buys at least one chance a month.  I know many of us do not really need any more books, but you can always donate the book back to the Roundtable.  The Raffle allows us to fund the great out-of-town speakers Mike Peters finds for us.

The Columbus Barracks Roundtable has cancelled their May meeting.

I am going to set a date in the late summer or fall (once we have more certainty on COVID-19 meeting restrictions)  to have everyone invite a person under the age of 35 to our meeting. We will have an open bar at La Navona for the “youngsters” where they can a beer, glass of wine or a soft drink.  I will coordinate with Mike Peters so that we will have the event on a night when we have a speaker who will fit that audience.  You can invite a grandchild, a child, a friend, a co-worker or a complete stranger, but I want to emphasize that I want everyone to bring someone.  This will be a fun event and will give you an excuse to bring someone who you might otherwise be not inclined to importune. So, start thinking about someone you would invite.

No one has contacted me regarding their burning desire to serve as an officer of the Roundtable, so Dave, Tom, Mike, Dale and I will retain our respective seats by acclimation.

I hope that you all have been able to access some of the great history and Civil War presentations that have been produced by hosts such as the American Battlefield Trust and The National Civil War Museum during the pandemic. These programs (“Zoom Goes the History”) and the YouTube channels have been great, and they have helped me deal with some of the isolation effects of the stay-at-home orders.  Go to Civilwar.org or search “The National civil War Museum” on YouTube and enjoy!!

Jamie Ryan
President .

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