Posted by: TC Maurice | April 1, 2021

Meeting Announcement

WHEN: April 14th

Where: La Navona, 154 North Hamilton Road. Gahanna Ohio 43230
AND on Zoom.

The speaker will NOT be at La Navona but members and guests are welcome to join other members who plan to attend the meeting in person to view the Zoom broadcast.

Join Zoom Meeting
 https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81876507174?pwd=N0gxRHNTK2NvVlBKSmloY1hyTUlmZz09

Meeting ID: 818 7650 7174
Passcode: 331188
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Meeting ID: 818 7650 7174
Passcode: 331188
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kd0Zhuj7eI

Time: 7pm

Speaker: Dr. Donald S. Frazier

Topic: Tempest Over Texas.

Tempest Over Texas
the Fall and Winter Campaigns of 1863-1864

Picking up the story of the Civil War in Louisiana and Texas after the fall of Port Hudson and Vicksburg, Tempest Over Texas is a tale of Confederate confusion. What was left to be done west of the river?  How should the would-be nation carry on in the Trans-Mississippi given the new strategic realities? Where would the next Union blow fall? How could the war effort sustain itself as the severed limb of the CSA?
Likewise, Federal forces gathered from Memphis to New Orleans were in search of a new mission. The destruction of the remaining Confederate armies west of the Mississippi should be no small matter, and the reconstruction of Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas should be easy enough to accomplish. Yet, fate intervened. International intrigues and disasters on distant battlefields would all conspire to confuse and perplex war-planners.
Meanwhile, both sides continued to square off in this corner of the war as the national calamity continued to play out.
Based on his book, Tempest Over Texas: The Fall and Winter Campaigns, 1863–1864, the fourth installment in Dr. Donald S. Frazier’s award-winning Louisiana Quadrille series. 

Dr. Donald S. Frazier is the Director of The Texas Center at Schreiner University in Kerrville. A graduate of The University of Texas at Arlington and Texas Christian University, Frazier is also the award-winning author of five books on the Civil War including Blood and TreasureCottoncladsFire in the Cane Field, Thunder Across the Swamp, and Blood on the Bayou.  His latest work, Tempest Over Texas, was released in 2020. His other work includes serving as co-author of Frontier TexasHistoric Abilene, and The Texas You Expect, as well as general editor of The U.S. and Mexico at War and a collection of letters published as Love and War:  The Civil War Letter and Medicinal Book of Augustus V. Ball

In addition to his teaching duties, Frazier has been very involved in work on Civil War and frontier heritage trails in Texas, New Mexico, and Louisiana, and work on historical projects in Europe and Mexico.  He helped design Frontier Texas!, a museum-attraction in Abilene, Texas. He is the writer and director for the video Our Home, Our Rights:  Texas and Texans in the Civil War, a winner of the Mitchell Wilder Award for Excellence in Publications and Media Design from the Texas Association of Museums. Come and Take It, a treatment of the life story of Susannah Dickinson, is his first full length play. 

Dr. Frazier is an elected member of the prestigious Philosophical Society of Texas, the oldest learned organization in the state, a Fellow of the Texas State Historical Association, and a Director-Scholar on the board of the Texas Historical Foundation.

Posted by: TC Maurice | March 1, 2021

Meeting Announcement

When: March 10th

Where: La Navona, 154 North Hamilton Road. Gahanna Ohio 43230
AND on Zoom

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87081043519?pwd=dGszeTZmamZCMnZRMXc3K2xMWlp2QT09

You can also call in: +1-646-558-8656

Meeting ID: 870 8104 3519

Passcode: 400281

Time: 7pm

Speaker: Sam Hood

Topic: “Patriots Twice: Former Confederates and the Building of America after the Civil War.”

After the Civil War, former Confederates integrated into the newly reunified United States and many attained positions of prominence in the federal government, the U.S. military, higher education, medicine, law, science, industry and commerce, the arts, and philanthropy. Ten postwar U.S. presidents beginning with Ulysses S. Grant appointed former Confederates to positions including supreme court justices, U.S. attorney generals, U.S. Navy secretaries, diplomats, and U.S. Army generals during the Spanish-American War. Former Confederates were elected mayors of such unlikely cities as Los Angeles and Minneapolis. Confederates became presidents of the American Medical Association, American Medical Association, the American Chemical Society, the American Surgical Association, the Sierra Club, and others. Former Confederates founded many colleges and universities–some for African-Americans and women–and served as presidents of universities such as Cal-Berkeley.  

Stephen M. “Sam” Hood is a collateral descendent of Confederate General John Bell Hood. Sam is a retired industrial construction company owner, and lives in Myrtle Beach SC with his wife of 43 years, the former Martha Ann Hager. He is a 1970 graduate of Kentucky Military Institute, and earned a BBA in Marketing from Marshall University in 1976. Sam served in the United States Marine Corps Reserve and has had a lifelong interest in Civil War history and the sport of soccer, of which he is a member of the West Virginia Soccer Association Hall of Fame. His book John Bell Hood: The Rise, Fall, and Resurrection of a Confederate General won the 2013 Albert Castel Civil War History Book of the Year Award and the 2014 Walt Whitman Civil War History Book of the Year Award. Sam’s 2015 books The Lost Papers of Confederate General John Bell Hood was awarded the Bonnie Blue Book Award by the Sons of Confederate Veterans. His latest book is Patriots Twice: Former Confederates and the Building of America after the Civil War. Sam is a member of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, Sons of Confederate Veterans, past member of the Board of Directors of the Blue Gray Education Society of Chatham VA, and is past president of the Board of Directors of Confederate Memorial Hall Museum in New Orleans.

March Presidents Message

I have attached hereto Tom Ayres’ write up on last month’s excellent presentation by our own member Mark Laubacher, “A Hospital of Firsts: USS Red Rover.” 

Our Treasurer’s Report from Pete Zuhars:

Treasurer’s Report for February 2021

Beginning checking account balance 1/1/2021 = $2210.10

January receipts = $145.00

January expenses = $0

Ending checking account balance 2/26/2021 = $2355.10

January starts our year, so everyone owes their dues again. I realize that we are not spending much on speaker’s now, but we will as the year goes on, and we will probably need to keep spending on technology.  Therefore, I ask that everyone either bring their dues to the meeting or send a check to Pete Zuhars at 4879 Veley Road, Delaware, Ohio 43015.  Dues are $25 per person, $35 for a family or $15 for a student.

As a note of interest, Fort Steuben in Steubenville has a display of Civil War antiquities from February 22 until March 19. 

See you on March 10! 

Jamie Ryan
President

Posted by: TC Maurice | January 29, 2021

Meeting Announcement

When: February 10th

Where:  La Navona, 154 North Hamilton Road. Gahanna Ohio 43230
AND on Zoom

Time: 7pm

Speaker: Mark Laubacher, Roundtable member

Topic: ” A Hospital of Firsts: USS Red Rover

My Fellow Roundtable Members:  Our next meeting will be February 10, 2021 at 7 pm at La Navona, 154 North Hamilton, Gahanna, Ohio. Our speaker will be our own member Mark Laubacher, and his topic will be “A Hospital of Firsts: USS Red Rover.”  Mark will be presenting in person for those of you who wish to come to La Navona. Ed Chadwick will also be supervising our Zoom broadcast of the meeting (see below for the link).  I have personally seen an overview of this program when we conducted a practice session last week, and I think this will be a great presentation of a topic of vast importance that most of us know very little about. I encourage you to attend (either live or virtually); I think you will learn a lot and be very entertained.

If you come to La Navona on February 10, please follow all the normal COVID-19 protocols: wear a mask and practice social distancing.

Here is the Zoom link:

Topic: February 10 Roundtable Meeting

Time: Feb 10, 2021 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83079935953?pwd=MjIxZnpudXZRd3c4QWZmanFnbkhvUT09

Meeting ID: 830 7993 5953

Passcode: 853144

I have attached Tom Ayres’ report on our January debate (which, in my opinion, was really good).

Our Treasurer’s Report from Pete Zuhars:

Treasurer’s Report for January 2021

Beginning checking account balance 1/1/2021 = $2190.10

January receipts = $20.00

January expenses = $0

Ending checking account balance 1/29/2021 = $2210.10

January starts our year, so everyone owes their dues again. I realize that we are not spending much on speaker’s now, but we will as the year goes on, and we will probably need to keep spending on technology.  Therefore, I ask that everyone either bring their dues to the meeting or send a check to Pete Zuhars at 4879 Veley Road, Delaware, Ohio 43015.  Dues are $25 per person, $35 for a family or $15 for a student.

See you on February 10! 

Posted by: TC Maurice | January 5, 2021

Meeting Announcement

WHEN: January 13th 2021

Where: THERE WILL BE NO INPERSON COMPONENT OF THE MEETING THIS MONTH. THE MEETING WILL BE ENTIRELY CONDUCTED VIA ZOOM.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89281371215?pwd=b1dmSVlWVFJXcXJ4bjdtNWhxQ0Z2UT09

Meeting ID: 892 8137 1215
Passcode: 065716
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Meeting ID: 892 8137 1215
Passcode: 065716
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kjkNUO7yX

Time: 7pm

Speaker: You! This will be a roundtable member participation event.

TOPIC: Examples of good & bad cooperation in joint Army-Navy operations during the Civil War.

Presidents Message; My Fellow Members:  Happy New Year. I hope everyone is healthy and doing well.   Our next meeting on January 13 will be our annual Roundtable debate.  This will be a completely virtual meeting.  Ed and Tim will run the technical aspects of the Zoom meeting, and I will serve as debate moderator.  The topic will be examples of good & bad cooperation in joint Army-Navy operations during the Civil War. I have already heard from several members who have good information to contribute to the discussion. I encourage everyone to participate; Ed and Tim will have a “raise hand” function worked out on Zoom,  so we can all jump in and not worry about speaking over someone else.

I will circulate the Zoom link for the January 13 meeting a couple of days before the 13th.

For more information on the debate and the Roundtable in general, please go to our website at http://www.Centralohiocwrt.wordpress.com. 

Treasurer’s Report from Pete Zuhars:

Treasurer’s Report for December 2020

Beginning checking account balance 12/1/2020 = $2190.10

November receipts = $20.00 donation

November expenses = $0

Ending checking account balance 12/31/2020 = $2210.10

Posted by: TC Maurice | January 4, 2021

Meeting Announcement

WHEN: January 13th 2021

Where: THERE WILL BE NO INPERSON COMPONENT OF THE MEETING THIS MONTH. THE MEETING WILL BE ENTIRELY CONDUCTED VIA ZOOM.

Zoom link will be published in a few days.

Time: 7pm

Speaker: You! This will be a roundtable member participation event.

TOPIC: Examples of good & bad cooperation in joint Army-Navy operations during the Civil War.

Presidents Message; My Fellow Members:  Happy New Year. I hope everyone is healthy and doing well.   Our next meeting on January 13 will be our annual Roundtable debate.  This will be a completely virtual meeting.  Ed and Tim will run the technical aspects of the Zoom meeting, and I will serve as debate moderator.  The topic will be examples of good & bad cooperation in joint Army-Navy operations during the Civil War. I have already heard from several members who have good information to contribute to the discussion. I encourage everyone to participate; Ed and Tim will have a “raise hand” function worked out on Zoom,  so we can all jump in and not worry about speaking over someone else.

I will circulate the Zoom link for the January 13 meeting a couple of days before the 13th.

For more information on the debate and the Roundtable in general, please go to our website at http://www.Centralohiocwrt.wordpress.com. 

Treasurer’s Report from Pete Zuhars:

Treasurer’s Report for December 2020

Beginning checking account balance 12/1/2020 = $2190.10

November receipts = $20.00 donation

November expenses = $0

Ending checking account balance 12/31/2020 = $2210.10

Posted by: TC Maurice | November 29, 2020

No Meeting in December

Members please remember that there is NO roundtable meeting in December. Please stay safe and enjoy the holidays.

Presidents Message:

My Fellow Members:  I hope everyone is healthy and doing well.  As is our tradition, we will not meet in December.  Our next meeting in January will be our annual Roundtable debate.  This year, since we will have members attending virtually, I thought that we should discuss a little broader (and maybe a little less dialectic) topic by discussing examples of good & bad cooperation in joint Army-Navy operations during the Civil War. Our last speaker, Craig Swain, gave us some great examples of poor (and non-existent) cooperation between the Union Army and Navy forces at Fort Sumter throughout the War. As always, I encourage everyone to do a little research and be prepared to participate.  I am sure that,  with a little bit of thought, you can all come up with a number of examples to discuss. I would really like to hear something about Confederate joint operations if anyone can come up with something on point.

I will circulate the Zoom link for the annual debate when I circulate my January 2021 newsletter in late December.

For more information on the debate and the Roundtable in general, please go to our website at Centralohiocwrt.wordpress.com. 

Our Treasurer’s Report from Dave Delisio:

Treasurer’s Report for November 2020

Beginning checking account balance 11/1/2020 = $2190.10

November receipts = $20.00 donation

November expenses = $0

Ending checking account balance 11/30/2020 = $2210.10

Dave has asked to be relieved of his Treasurer duties, which he has performed admirably for eight years.  I have accepted Dave’s retirement from office, and I have asked Pete Zuhars to fill in the void. If anyone else is interested in serving, please let me know and Pete will gladly stand aside.  I want to thank Dave Delisio for doing such a great job that I never had to worry about anything regarding the financial standing of the Roundtable. I hope everyone will give Dave a hearty “Atta-a-boy” the next time you see him (either live or virtually).

I have also attached hereto Tom Ayres Report of our meeting in November, when Craig Swain talked to us about the Siege and Reduction of fort Sumter. Tom has done his usual superb job of reporting on the speaker and his topic, and adding information of interest to our members.

https://centralohiocwrt.files.wordpress.com/2020/11/seige-and-reduction-of-fort-sumter-3.pdf


Jamie Ryan
President

Here is an announcement by the National Park Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service concerning Land and Water Conservation Fund revenues that will be targeted this fiscal year towards the acquisition of private land by willing sellers in or near Civil War related National Park Service sites;

Mill Springs National Battlefield Monument, Kentucky: $425,000 to purchase property located between Mill Springs Battlefield Road and the western banks of the Cumberland River. This tract contains an original Confederate trench line, the site of Brig. Gen. Zollicoffer’s headquarters, a 2-gun cannon battery position, and the Confederate cemetery. Indentations in the ground remain from hundreds of Confederate cabins. The battlefield is the site of the Union’s first decisive Civil War victory and where Zollicoffer, a congressman from Tennessee, was killed. Its importance was recognized by both sides during the war and acquisition of this parcel will preserve this historically significant area.

Vicksburg National Military Park, Lousiana/Mississippi: $1,453,000 to acquire 21 tracts purchased by the American Battlefield Trust for the purposes of creating the Champion Hill Unit of Vicksburg National Military Park. They are in the highest tier of lands identified for acquisition in the park’s 2018 Land Protection Plan. In addition to its historical significance, this area connects to adjacent tracts (800 acres) donated by the state of Mississippi in 2019 to help form a contiguous park. The area has experienced threats of encroachments, poaching, and archaeological resource theft. Acquisition will allow the resources to be protected and visitors to access a portion of the core battlefield.

River Raisin National Battlefield Park, Michigan: $1.1 million to acquire 72 tracts of lands that are located in the core area of the unit, including the Springwells site and the Hulls Trace unit. Fee and easement interests will be donated to protect a variety of archaeological and cultural landscape resources directly relating to the battles. This includes the site where the U.S. launched the first shots of the War of 1812 and more than 1,000 years ago native residents of Springwells toiled, prospered and raised monuments. The acquisition will also provide recreational opportunities associated with increased public access the Huron River.

Battlefield Parks (multiple states): $621,000 to acquire high priority battlefield land inholdings within the National Park System that are experiencing significant threat to the resource. These lands are often temporarily protected by partner organizations able to nimbly navigate real estate acquisition and then wait for the federal government to bring the land into individual park units. As of December 30, 2018, within park units that have battlefields there are over 36,000 unprotected acres in individual parcels. Funds from this project will be directed to the highest priority “shovel ready” acquisitions, which will be dynamic as landowners consider options once funding is available.

Fort Donelson National Battlefield, Tennessee: $559,000 to obtain tracts that will protect battlefield land that saw considerable action and troop movement. In this area of the Confederate Break-Out, the Confederates attempted an unsuccessful surprise assault in hopes of opening a corridor to flee the Fort. In addition, these lands are affiliated with the former African-American community, “Free State” (created by those formerly enslaved). They include historical structures such as surviving “colored school,” and an abandoned African-American Methodist Church. Acquisition of these tracts will complete the Confederate Break-Out area and the primary “Free State” interpretive area for public use and access.

Shiloh National Military Park, Tennessee: $558,000 to acquire seven tracts that are part of the Fallen Timbers battlefield. The tracts are owned by the American Battlefield Trust and comprise 57 percent of the Fallen Timbers site. Tens of thousands of citizens from across the nation directly donated funds to complete the purchase and preservation of these tracts. The site lacks protection by an authorized land management steward and archaeological resources associated with the Civil War and other periods of human occupation are unprotected and open to looting. Sites have also recently experienced vandalism to existing structures and natural features. The purchase of these tracts will significantly enhance the battlefield scenery and permit visitor access to the property for recreational use consistent with park purposes.

Stones River National Battlefield, Tennessee: $243,000 to purchase part of the core battlefield and the scene of intense fighting, including the location of Federal artillery on the final day of the battle. The Union victory at this site resulted in the Confederate withdrawal from middle Tennessee. Acquisition of this tract would protect the site of significant battlefield action, enhance wildlife habitat, and provide for trail development for visitor access and recreation.

Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park, Texas: $3.5 million to purchase the last high-priority core battlefield inholding, containing valuable cultural resources including much of the Mexican battle line; Arista’s Hill, which was used as a vantage point by commanding Mexican General Mariano Arista during the battle; and the Palo Alto Inn, which was constructed during the U.S.-Mexican War to serve as a stopover for individuals traveling from Port Isabel to Matamoros, Mexico. Protection of this property will expand recreational access for almost 260,000 neighbors, giving visitors the ability to visit the entire battlefield and it will provide more than 10 miles of trail to connect current battlefield trails to city trails, including the 8.5 mile Historic Battlefield Rail-Trail.

Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, Virginia: $931,000 to acquire two tracts that fall within the 1989 revised boundary and are located at the Spotsylvania Court House Battlefield, which received the highest condition and significance ratings from the Civil War Sites Advisory Commission. Acquisition of these tracts provides important access and interpretive opportunities to key areas of the battlefield, preserving the sense of place that surrounds Burnside Drive. Burnside Drive is the scene of heavy fighting during a May 12, 1864 battle.

Petersburg National Battlefield, Virgina: $341,000 to but land that is at the core of two nationally significant battles (as determined by the Civil War Sites Advisory Commission and approved by Congress). Acquisition would allow for long-term protection and preservation of key terrain and the many landscape elements that have survived. The federal objective of destroying Confederate supply lines, especially railroads, into Petersburg and Richmond is best exhibited and interpreted on these locations. Local law enforcement have dealt with cases of relic hunting in the area but lack legal authority to enforce action under the Archaeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA); Federal law enforcement will be able to enforce the Act more effectively.

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